Mayor Jackson: Reopen Public Square Now. #TransitBelongs

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RNC Event Zone May be a Problem for Bus and Train Travelers

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Stop the Opportunity Corridor and Fund RTA Now!

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Alternatives to RTA Fare Increases and Service Cuts. Or what we can do until Ohio has dedicated transit funding.

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Fed Up with corporate influence in food policy and what to do about it

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Cuyahoga county sinners pay so 34 other counties can listen to Indians baseball

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A call for the Opportunity Corridor to be reevaluated with more transparency and honesty

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We Need Complete Streets and Transit, Jobs that Break the Cycle of Poverty, Safe Food and Transparency

1. We need to encourage walking and cycling to help increase physical activity and prevent obesity. To do this, we need to have policies on transportation that encourage walking and cycling for daily travel. Completes Streets are streets that are designed for everyone, including pedestrians, cyclists, motorists and transit users of all ages.  A bill has been introduced in the senate by Mark Begich (D-Alaska) and Brian Schatz (D-Hawaii) called the Safe Streets act of 2014. The bill would encourage complete streets by requiring all federally-funded transportation projects, with certain exceptions, to accommodate the safety and convenience of all users in accordance with complete streets policy. For more info, check out this article on Grist.

 

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Ending Food Deserts in Clevo, Decreases in Childhood Obesity, New Food Label, and a Fermentation School Bus

Some good food news in Cleveland and in childhood obesity. Also info on a new food label and the need for independent sources, in science and beyond…

1. Everyone should check out this Kickstarter about the Farm Food Program at Case Western Reserve University’s Farm.  The FFP will provided jobs to Cleveland residents to help grow hundreds of pounds of produce exclusively for residents living in food deserts around Cleveland. The graphic below is taken from their shirt that you can get from donating!

Farm to Food Desert

 

2. While I am dreaming about decent weather, biking, sunshine, and vitamin D, Tara Whitsitt is making her dream a reality (wow I am a terrible writer). Last summer, Tara dreamed about driving a school bus full of fermented foods around the country last summer. She decided to make these dreams a reality and started Fermentation of Wheels. Her school bus is touring around the country this year, teaching fermentation and connecting people with local food. She will be making her way over to Ohio in July! If you are interested in fermented foods you may also want to check out Sandor Katz’s website Wild Fermentation. Katz was also interviewed on Food Sleuth Radio last April. I plan to post more about fermented foods and gut bacteria, especially since gut bacteria may play a role in obesity.

 

3. The Cleveland Film fest program guides are out this week and there are many movies I am looking forward to, including Farmland. Farmland is the latest documentary from Academy Award winner James Moll. The movie goes behind the scenes with a new generation of younger farmers, and tries to explore all sides of modern farming. Check out the trailer…

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A Call for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to Take a Stance on GMOs

As I mentioned previously, GMO Free Northeast Ohio showed the documentary Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives last Thursday at the Mustard Seed Market in Solon. While I am glad to make it out of Solon alive (lack of public transportation = long walk from the bus in the street due to snow covered sidewalksRIP Joseph Brown), I am looking to get a less biased view of GMOs. The movie should be watched, but for people who are already skeptical of GMOs, it offers little answers, which I guess is the intention of the movie. Yes, chronic diseases and allergies have increased since GMO foods were introduced in 1996, but correlation does not equal causation. I needed to continue to look elsewhere to get more information on GMOs, though I still heartily agree with the precautionary principal, and that more long-term studies are needed.

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