Ending Food Deserts in Clevo, Decreases in Childhood Obesity, New Food Label, and a Fermentation School Bus

Some good food news in Cleveland and in childhood obesity. Also info on a new food label and the need for independent sources, in science and beyond…

1. Everyone should check out this Kickstarter about the Farm Food Program at Case Western Reserve University’s Farm.  The FFP will provided jobs to Cleveland residents to help grow hundreds of pounds of produce exclusively for residents living in food deserts around Cleveland. The graphic below is taken from their shirt that you can get from donating!

Farm to Food Desert

 

2. While I am dreaming about decent weather, biking, sunshine, and vitamin D, Tara Whitsitt is making her dream a reality (wow I am a terrible writer). Last summer, Tara dreamed about driving a school bus full of fermented foods around the country last summer. She decided to make these dreams a reality and started Fermentation of Wheels. Her school bus is touring around the country this year, teaching fermentation and connecting people with local food. She will be making her way over to Ohio in July! If you are interested in fermented foods you may also want to check out Sandor Katz’s website Wild Fermentation. Katz was also interviewed on Food Sleuth Radio last April. I plan to post more about fermented foods and gut bacteria, especially since gut bacteria may play a role in obesity.

 

3. The Cleveland Film fest program guides are out this week and there are many movies I am looking forward to, including Farmland. Farmland is the latest documentary from Academy Award winner James Moll. The movie goes behind the scenes with a new generation of younger farmers, and tries to explore all sides of modern farming. Check out the trailer…

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A Call for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to Take a Stance on GMOs

As I mentioned previously, GMO Free Northeast Ohio showed the documentary Genetic Roulette: The Gamble of Our Lives last Thursday at the Mustard Seed Market in Solon. While I am glad to make it out of Solon alive (lack of public transportation = long walk from the bus in the street due to snow covered sidewalksRIP Joseph Brown), I am looking to get a less biased view of GMOs. The movie should be watched, but for people who are already skeptical of GMOs, it offers little answers, which I guess is the intention of the movie. Yes, chronic diseases and allergies have increased since GMO foods were introduced in 1996, but correlation does not equal causation. I needed to continue to look elsewhere to get more information on GMOs, though I still heartily agree with the precautionary principal, and that more long-term studies are needed.

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Weekly Update: Free Lunches for Low Income Schools & Junk Food Banned, Food Chains film, GRAS lawsuit and more!

The past few days I’ve started working on an article. It’s a large endeavor and I’m not sure I’ll even finish it, but right now I am still working on it. For now, a few interesting bits from around the internet.

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Coalition of Immokalee Workers in Cleveland, will need your support in Columbus

Wendys

Did you know that 90% of tomatoes consumed in the US come from Florida? I didn’t until I started thinking about where my food comes from. After all, being a dietitian I am supposed help people “choose” (to purchase) foods that should be included in a healthy diet. Of course, one big problem is that we don’t eat enough fruits and vegetables. Encouraging intake of fruits and vegetables makes sense from a nutrition perspective, but if I am promoting these foods, shouldn’t I know where they come from and how they are produced?

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GMO OMG review, Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (lack of) position on GMOs, and Genetic Roulette Screenings

GMO OMG recently played at the Cleveland Cinematheque.

GMO OMG recently played at the Cleveland Cinematheque.

GMO OMG is a film by Jeremy Seifert focusing on Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO) in our food supply. This is Seifert’s first full-length documentary, and that is apartment in some aspects. Specifically, much of the movie is spent showing us that Siefert as a typical parent, concerned about what he is feeding his own children. In between the many shots of him with his family, traveling around the country asking people if they know what GMOs are (of course no one does!), taking pictures of his kids holding “GMO” signs, and many interviews with conventional farmers sharing their experiences with GMOs, there are some interesting scenes.

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Foodopoly podcast and Fair Food Program Event in Cleveland

Wenonah Hauter, executive director of Food & Water Watch and author of Foodopoly was featured on this week’s episode of Making Contact. I haven’t finished reading Foodopoly yet, but was planning to do a few posts about the book, so might as well start with some points from the show.

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